calumet412:

Merchandise Mart, 1931, Chicago. Charles Turzak

calumet412:

Merchandise Mart, 1931, Chicago. Charles Turzak

calumet412:

Oak and Rush, 1967, Chicago

calumet412:

Oak and Rush, 1967, Chicago

unidentified silent film, tinted, lost

orphanista:

George Willeman’s scan of frame from LIGHTS OF OLD BROADWAY (1925), a nitrate print belonging to actress Marion Davies. Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn (before there was a -Mayer). “Handschiegl coloring at its best!” says GW.

orphanista:

George Willeman’s scan of frame from LIGHTS OF OLD BROADWAY (1925), a nitrate print belonging to actress Marion Davies. Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn (before there was a -Mayer). “Handschiegl coloring at its best!” says GW.

Source.
natgeofound:

Women attend an archery class at the University of Texas, March 1928.Photograph by Clifton R. Adams, National Geographic

natgeofound:

Women attend an archery class at the University of Texas, March 1928.Photograph by Clifton R. Adams, National Geographic

"Who’s That Woman?" as performed at the first Boston tryout of Sondheim’s FOLLIES on February 20, 1971. Mary McCarty as Stella Deems, with the ladies of the Weissman Follies. The taps are the sound of the chorus boys in the basement being piped into the auditorium. The audience is clearly digging the whole thing.

Orchestration by Jonathan Tunick; dance arrangement by John Berkman. (The last part of the song was re-orchestrated before the Broadway opening.)

Three Kodachrome transparencies of Maxwell Street in Chicago c. 1955.

colortransparency:

Pontiac Commercial Shoot #1
Not sure what year this was taken.

1967 or 1968 (this is the ‘68 lineup.)

colortransparency:

Pontiac Commercial Shoot #1

Not sure what year this was taken.

1967 or 1968 (this is the ‘68 lineup.)

colortransparency:

State Street Looking South - Chicago, Illinois
May 1962

colortransparency:

State Street Looking South - Chicago, Illinois

May 1962

(Source: zestyblog)

theswinginsixties:

Aretha Franklin on the cover of Soul Illustrated, Fall 1968.

theswinginsixties:

Aretha Franklin on the cover of Soul Illustrated, Fall 1968.

(Source: pinterest.com, via damagenoted)


"She is one of the finest actresses in show business. A lot of young actors and actresses could have profited then and now from a few “seminars" with “Missy" on their professional attitudes—their regard for the business of being an actor—on their on-stage and off-stage deportment as it were, because I doubt that there ever has been, or ever will be, a greater ":pro" than Barbara." — Robert Taylor “Beloved by all directors, actors, crews, and extras.” — Frank Capra “Stanwyck can act the hell out of any part, and she can turn a chore into a challenge. She’s fun, and I’m glad I had a chance to make three movies with her. The Lady Eve was the best. She’s a delicious woman.” — Henry Fonda “She was just an extraordinary woman. She took the script, loved it, right from the word go, didn’t have the agent come and say, “Look, she’s to play a murderess, she must get more money, because she’s never going to work again. With Stanwyck, I had absolutely no difficulties at all. And she knew the script, everybody‘s lines. You could wake her up in the middle of the night and she’d know the scene. Never a fault, never a mistake — just a wonderful brain she had.” —Billy Wilder “She’s one of the greatest women and the one of the greatest actresses I ever worked with.” —Walter Huston “The best actress I ever worked with.” —Joel McCrea “Stanwyck, of course, was a brilliant actress. She could do anything.” —William Wellman “Working with Barbara Stanwyck was one of the greatest pleasures of my career.” —Fritz Lang “[Howard Hawks] always ranked her among the best actresses with whom he ever worked.” —Hawks biographer Todd McCarthy “Barbara Stanwyck is a fantastic actress. When she makes a gesture as she speaks a line, she has a way of suspending that motion in mid-air for a split second on a certain word which gives an imperceptible emphasis to that word.” —Mitchell Leisen “A professional’s professional, a superb technician with a voice quality that immediately hooked you with its humanness.” —King Vidor “Barbara Stanwyck had an instinct so sure she almost needed no direction.” —Preston Sturges “When [in 1932 Picturegoer] listed the top six female stars (Garbo, Constance Bennett, Dietrich, Chatterton, Shearer and Crawford), [Adolphe] Menjou himself told the editor that in Hollywood Stanwyck was rated above the last two.” —David Shipman “Barbara carried her success lightly; her attitude was one of utter professionalism and no noticeable temperament. As far as she was concerned, she was simply one of a hundred or so people gathered to make a movie—no more, no less.” — Robert Wagner “That is the kind of woman that makes whole civilizations topple.” — Kathleen Howard
"She is one of the finest actresses in show business. A lot of young actors and actresses could have profited then and now from a few “seminars" with “Missy" on their professional attitudes—their regard for the business of being an actor—on their on-stage and off-stage deportment as it were, because I doubt that there ever has been, or ever will be, a greater ":pro" than Barbara." — Robert Taylor

“Beloved by all directors, actors, crews, and extras.” — Frank Capra

“Stanwyck can act the hell out of any part, and she can turn a chore into a challenge. She’s fun, and I’m glad I had a chance to make three movies with her. The Lady Eve was the best. She’s a delicious woman.” — Henry Fonda

“She was just an extraordinary woman. She took the script, loved it, right from the word go, didn’t have the agent come and say, “Look, she’s to play a murderess, she must get more money, because she’s never going to work again. With Stanwyck, I had absolutely no difficulties at all. And she knew the script, everybody‘s lines. You could wake her up in the middle of the night and she’d know the scene. Never a fault, never a mistake — just a wonderful brain she had.” —Billy Wilder

“She’s one of the greatest women and the one of the greatest actresses I ever worked with.” —Walter Huston

“The best actress I ever worked with.” —Joel McCrea

“Stanwyck, of course, was a brilliant actress. She could do anything.” —William Wellman

“Working with Barbara Stanwyck was one of the greatest pleasures of my career.” —Fritz Lang

“[Howard Hawks] always ranked her among the best actresses with whom he ever worked.” —Hawks biographer Todd McCarthy

“Barbara Stanwyck is a fantastic actress. When she makes a gesture as she speaks a line, she has a way of suspending that motion in mid-air for a split second on a certain word which gives an imperceptible emphasis to that word.” —Mitchell Leisen

“A professional’s professional, a superb technician with a voice quality that immediately hooked you with its humanness.” —King Vidor

“Barbara Stanwyck had an instinct so sure she almost needed no direction.” —Preston Sturges

“When [in 1932 Picturegoer] listed the top six female stars (Garbo, Constance Bennett, Dietrich, Chatterton, Shearer and Crawford), [Adolphe] Menjou himself told the editor that in Hollywood Stanwyck was rated above the last two.” —David Shipman

“Barbara carried her success lightly; her attitude was one of utter professionalism and no noticeable temperament. As far as she was concerned, she was simply one of a hundred or so people gathered to make a movie—no more, no less.” — Robert Wagner

“That is the kind of woman that makes whole civilizations topple.” — Kathleen Howard

(Source: missavagardner, via warnerarchive)

Headline from THINGS TO COME (Alexander Korda, 1936.)

Headline from THINGS TO COME (Alexander Korda, 1936.)